Managing Comments, etc.

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Hi Folk! I’m learning how to manage comments, now that WordPress is screening them for me. I’m getting the usual amount of “crank” emails, notably from Hotmail addresses. It seems that “sonic 3D”, “Vauen”, “Converse37”, “Butler Shrimp” and “Fosteria Glass Ware” are trying to jam all the comments with emails that seem to advertise something. Hotmail and Geocities seem to be the source of most of these attempts at jamming up my blog. SO you $$##((&& of b***%%%es, cut it out! The most recent allowed comments came from Thad and Paul Etcheverry, under the Jerry Lewis post, so if you want to read what they had to say, scroll on down there. Please feel free to comment on anything, I now know how to edit the comments. You can also write to me at blogmolasses@att.net.

The comics this week feature the start of a Jim Tyer story from Coo-Coo comics #16, from March, 1945. This story seems to have been influential on Milton Knight, especially that crazy planet Saturn in the first panel. Come join Tippy as he voyages among the solar system in the next few weeks.  MARVELOUS MIKE this week is from 10/29/1956 to 11/3, Cliff’s old friend Fencemetal, palms off his tonic formula, “Relaxo” on Crump’s boss, Mr. Kimball, then vanishes “bag and baggage”. Of course, Mike is on hand, quoting from Alexander Pope, and ready to help his “dad” out. KRAZY KAT this week is from 3/20 to 3/25/1939, and features Offissa Pupp wagering dimes on Ignatz’s well-worn behavior of tossing bricks, leaving poor Krazy weeping at the end of the sequence. We end with the next two pages of the “Rock and Rollo” story “Too Much Energy” from Felix #8 that we began last week. Rock really gets pepped up on the Professor’s formula and wall papers the whole house, including the TV screen! Exciting conclusion of this Tyer mini-story next week.

2 Responses to “Managing Comments, etc.”

  1. Hi Mark. I want to compliment you on the commentaries you did on the latest Looney Tunes Golden Collection. I always go to your commentaries first, simply because they’re full of so much information.

    Here’s a question for you. The trombone gobble sound effect (“yadada yadada”) seems to have originated in Gus Arnheim’s band. It’s there in the Ising Merrie Melody You Don’t Know What You’re Doing. There’s not a lot of info on the band online, but it appears that the trombone player was named Billy White. So, can we credit him with the sound effect? And do you know if it was ever re-recorded or if the circa-1930 trombone gobble just kept getting pulled from the sound effects library?

  2. Mark Kausler says:

    Hi Mark,
    Thanks for writing and all the compliments. I checked with the eminent musicologist, Randy Skredtvedt, and he gives this info about the Arnheim Trombone Gobbler: “Brian Rust’s American Dance Discography lists Marlo Imes and Billy White as the two trombonists with Gus Arnheim in 1931, so if there’s a gobbler in the Arnheim band, it’s one of those fellows…Marlo Imes is the sole trombonist in the Arnheim records of 1932 and early ’33, so if there’s a gobble on any of those he’d be the culprit.” Also Randy commented about the Abe Lyman band, which did the soundtracks for “One More Time”, “Smile Darn Ya Smile” and “Lady, Play Your Mandolin”. “That band included a gobbler named Orlando “Slim” Martin. His gobble is heard to good effect on the Lyman record of “Where’d You Get Those Eyes?” You can see him doing his gobble in a 1930 B-Western called “Pardon My Gun”, which has a long sequence of the Lyman band playing at, of all things, a barn dance in a rowdy western town.”
    Maybe “Slim” Martin jammed with the Arnheim ensemble for this cartoon. If you have heard the record of “Eyes”, it sounds like the same gobbling technique. Randy really knows his stuff, both musically and “movically”.

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