The Oral Tradition Finds It’s Tongue

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Felix this time is from 12-7 to 12-13-1936, Felix finally parts company from Detective Tanglefoot after being threatened by the tough counterfeiters. Felix actually disappears from his own strip for two days in this week, 12-8 and 12-9. Starting on 12-12, a new daily story begins, as Felix tries to assist an off-season football team. The Sunday page this time really looks like something out of the Van Beuren color Felix cartoons. The bull looks like he escaped from a Molly Moo Cow cartoon. Nice drawing on the bull as he charges up and down hills. This could be Jack Bogle again, but maybe it’s Tom Palmer who worked on the Van Beuren Felix cartoons. Let’s hear from “the room” on this!

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Krazy is from 5-27 to 6-1-1940 this time. Adventures of “The Brick” are featured in this week’s batch. I like Ignatz speaking Spanish (“Pobrecito Chulo”) in the 5-31, as Offissa Pupp grinds his beloved brick to clay dust. Ignatz also lays out a bit of Spanish in the 5-29 strip.

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Elsa is the only kid on the block who can outrun the monster Patrick in this week’s strips from 2-28 to 3-5-1966. Elsa and Godfrey seem to be the only other kids in Patrick’s neighborhood. Mal keeps the focus squarely on Patrick most of the time. It’s nice to see the Post-Dispatch vary the colors a bit, to blue from the usual golden yellow. You’ll never get these colors from microfilm!

In an effort to keep the oral tradition of storytelling alive, I have another story from Dorothy Parker, “The Sexes”, originally published in The New Republic, July 13, 1927. It’s a woman/man dialog.  Ms. Parker’s writing style really had an influence on movie dialog and radio writing (Jack Benny, Easy Aces, The Bickersons) in the early 1930s. Dorothy also wrote directly for the screen on more than one occasion.  Note how she slyly introduces the concept of jealousy into the story just by the tone of voice that’s implied in the writing. The man really has to struggle with the situation to get to what’s really bothering the woman. Dorothy’s women usually don’t like to say anything too strongly or directly, but in feline fashion, dryly and acidly comment until the heart of the matter is revealed. This story only runs 7.5 minutes, so won’t take as much of your time as “Mrs. Hofstader”, which I presented last month. I got almost no reaction to that story, 17 minutes worth. Here’s the link:

http://www.archive.org/details/TheSexesReadByMarkKausler

Remember as always, DON’T BUY BP!! OR ARCO, NEITHER!! Please help my friend and producer of “It’s ‘The Cat'”, Greg Ford, recover from his devestating loss. His apartment in New York City burned almost completely in a recent fire, (see “Greg’s Fire” in my archives). Any contribution of any size would be very much appreciated. You may contribute through my Paypal address: kausler@att.net , or write to Greg at: Greg Ford, 115 West 30th St., Suite 1204, New York, N.Y. 10001. Many thanks to you, kind readers. I’m sorry I haven’t posted very often lately, a lot of activity in the painting arena has kept me away. I’m involved a bit with comics as well, can’t say too much about that.  C U next time!

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